Category "Uncategorized"

30Sep2019

A child is always expected to remove footwear before entering a Montessori House of Children. Why do we insist on children removing footwear, keeping things by themselves and doing certain activities? I know some parents must be wondering why in a school I insist on this.

As every parent knows, the preschool child wants to be with adults, to take part in the activities of daily adult life. Doing work like adults makes them confident and happy. The Montessori Practical Life materials allow him/her to do just that. When a child enters the preschool around 2 years of age, the Practical Life area provides the link between home and school. In the classroom, with child-sized tools that actually work, a young child is able to perform the same activities he has seen adults do: polishing, scrubbing, pouring, sweeping, rolling chappatis etc. The pace is unhurried, and an adult is nearby to help if needed, but not to interfere.
These exercises correspond to a child’s sensitive period for refinement of movement and coordination as well as his growing sense of independence. “I can do it myself” is the motto the young child, and Montessori encourages and fosters this independence.
Each of these activities have a reason of learning and is not just for discipline and fun. They are more helpful in brain development of a child than any other book learning.

 


30Sep2019

The Montessori classroom provides the environment and materials that children need for their personal development. The classroom will always have in mixed age group with every child being unique in their understanding of the activities. In the Montessori House of Children, they are given the freedom to choose their activities according to their own interests and readiness in a non-competitive environment. Off course, there are some limits which the child has to follow. The habits and skills which children develop become an integral part of their personality .They will help the children grow more confidently, observe more carefully, and concentrate better throughout their life.
If a child is finishing an activity faster, the activity can be made more challenging by putting time limit. We can encourage repetitions for complete mastery of the skill, and also manipulate the activity by changing it a little to make it more challenging for the child.
Maria Montessori in her book ‘The Discovery Of The Child’ mentioned, “Repetition is the secret of perfection”. Like the old adage, “practice makes perfect”, we can all agree on the importance of repetition in the Montessori environment. The child who finishes faster should be encouraged to master the activity and become more adept with it through repetitions. He/she can also be encouraged to help other children with the activity he/she has already mastered.